Disc Protrusion Treatment Options

In this video, Dr Husbands talks about disc protrusion treatment options.


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Neck Pain and Back Pain Remedies

In this video, Dr Husbands shares for neck pain and back pain remedies you can do at home.


Let me know what you think by posting a comment below.  If you have any questions regarding chiropractic, nack pain or back pain remedies, you can post it as a comment or contact me through our contact form above.

Are Chiropractic Adjustments Safe

In this video, Dr Husbands answers the question, “Are chiropractic adjustments (chiropractic treatments) safe?”


Let me know what you think by posting a comment below.  If you have any questions regarding chiropractic adjustments, back pain or any musculoskeletal pain, you can post it as a comment or contact me through our contact form above.

Do Chiropractic Treatments Hurt

In this video, Dr Husbands answers the question, “Do chiropractic treatments hurt?”


Let me know what you think by posting a comment below.  If you have any questions regarding chiropractic treatments, back pain or any musculoskeletal pain, you can post it as a comment or contact me through our contact form above.

Chiropractic Techniques

In this video, Dr Husbands answers the question, “What are the different chiropractic techniques?”


Let me know what you think by posting a comment below.  If you have any questions regarding chiropractic techniques, back pain or any musculoskeletal pain, you can post it as a comment or contact me through our contact form above.

Back Pain Causes

In this video, Dr Husbands answers the question, “What are the common back pain causes?”


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Back Pain Treatment Options

In this video, Dr Husbands answers the question, “What are the treatment options for back pain?”

Let me know what you think by posting a comment below.  If you have any questions regarding back pain treatment options, you can post it as a comment or contact me through our contact form above.

Faster Healing of Muscle Tears, Sprains or Strains

Recently, while performing a chiropractic adjustment on a patient, I felt an immediate pain in my elbow. From my body building background and many years in health care, I knew exactly what had happened. I had a significant strain of the long head of the triceps tendon where it inserts at the elbow.

“Wait, this can’t happen now!”, I thought to myself. “I’ve got more people to treat today, tomorrow, next week…”

When a sprain or strain occurs blood vessels in the area get leaky and inflammatory cells come to the area. This causes the pain, swelling and bruising. My recent injury brought to mind a solution I have been using for myself and my patients. I will share this solution here about how to speed up healing of most musculoskeletal injuries.

I immediately started taking proteolytic enzymes within an hour after the injury occured. Proteolytic enzymes are a category of enzymes which helps to break down the formation of inflammatory cells that aggragate to an area after an injury. Enzymes are protein based molecules that speed up reactions. Some specific names of proteolytic enzymes are protease (derived from the fungi group Aspergillus), papain (from papaya), and bromelain (from pineapple). Immediately using proteolytic enzymes after a muscle, tendon, ligament or cartilage injury is very important. Numerous research studies performed over the last 70 years repeatedly show a significant improvement in pain relief, controlled inflammatory response, minimal or no brusing in the affected area, and rapidly accelerated connective tissue repair.

This reminds me of a more drastic experience of the efficacy of this that occured last year when I injured the lateral meniscus of my right knee at the gym. I was doing squats with 225 pounds, and on the 12th repetition I felt a sharp sudden pain in my right knee. I examined it and determined that I had a slight partial tear of the lateral meniscus. I stopped working out, showered, and went back to the office and started talking proteolytic enzymes, 2 each hour without food. I did that for the next 10 days. I also performed some physical therapy on myself using a cross-friction massage technique to the edge of the lateral meniscus. I had another doctor in the office perform cold laser therapy twice within that 10 day period. The meniscus was healed up to the point that I could go back to squats with 225 pounds in the gym by the 11th day post-injury without pain!

An even more drastic experience occured in November 2007. I fell and injured my left knee. My quadriceps muscle tore off where it attached to my left knee. While lying on the floor in excruciating pain, right after it happened, I asked my wife to get me the proteolytic enzymes and I took 3 right away. I took 3 every hour or two up until I had surgery to repair the muscle tear a few days later. The serious injury never had any bruise the whole time up to the surgery which surprised the surgeon. In addition, I didn’t need any pharmaceutical painkillers either before or after the surgery!

Proteolytic enzymes enhance normal tissue repair, while anti-inflammatory medications inhibit normal tissue repair. Proteolytic enzymes also inhibit scar tissue formation which is the cause of much of the residual pain and muscle or joint stiffness.

Skeptics may say this is anecdotal, and these are cases of one individual, but over the last 20 years, I have had many patients experience the benefits of proteolytic enzymes. As I mentioned earlier, there are 70 years of research literature supporting this. This is a great solution for anyone from the average person to the professional athlete. I highly recommend this solution for most muskuloskeletal injuries, unless you are taking blood thinner medications, in which case consult your doctor.

So how is my injured elbow? Well, the pain is minimal and I expect to only miss 1 scheduled training cycle for working my chest and triceps.

Let me know what you think by posting a comment below.  If you have any questions, you can post it as a comment or contact me through our contact form above.

Disc Pain: A Common Source of Back Pain

 

What is Disc Pain?

 

The discs lie between the round-shaped weight-bearing parts of the lower back vertebrae. They are called intervertebral discs. Disc pain results from small tears in the ligaments surrounding the gelatinous center of the intervertebral disc. The gelatinous center is called the nucleus pulposus. The nucleus pulposus leaks out of the small tears and compresses the spinal nerves in the lower back. This is what occurs when people refer to a herniated disc, disc protrusion, “slipped disc” or bulging disc, though not all these terms are technically correct. There are intervertebral discs in all three regions of the spinal column. The discs key function is for weight-bearing cushioning. The lower back or lumbar spine discs have the most weight bearing, therefore the lumbar discs are the most commonly injured. Proper body mechanics, balanced strong muscles and adequate water intake is necessary to keep the intervertebral discs healthy. The spinal nerves coming off the spinal cord exit off to each side and behind the discs. Therefore, when there is a disc injury, the spinal nerves are often irritated.

Causes of Disc Pain

 

The discs often become injured from trauma, such from auto accidents, sports injuries, incorrectly bending lifting and twisting while trying to pick up something, sitting for long periods with a sudden twisting upon standing, and even just sneezing vigorously. The ligaments surrounding the gelatinous center tear; the gelatinous fluid of the nucleus pulposus leaks out through these tears, and this irritates the spinal nerves.

Disc Pain/Injury Characteristics and Location

 

Intervertebral disc pain is often a sharp, shooting pain, and can cause numbness and tingling. Disc injury can also cause muscle weakness and muscle atrophy. It can be localized and is often referred to other areas. The more the nucleus pulposus protrudes out, the more it compresses and irritates the nerves. In the less frequent, most severe cases, a disc protrusion can compress the spinal cord causing various unusual symptoms such as inability to urinate or constipation. The more the nerve is irritated, the farther away from the local disc protrusion the pain will be referred to. Referred pain from lower back disc protrusions, which are the most common, can refer pain into the buttocks, groin, hips, front, back and side of the thighs, and even into the calves and feet. Lower back disc protrusions are often the most debilitating of the three spinal regions.

Diagnosis of Intervertebral Disc Pain

 

In office orthopedic tests performed by a properly trained and experienced clinician can help differentiate lower back intervertebral disc pain from other origins of pain, including facet joint pain. Diagnostic imaging with X-rays, CT-scans or MRI can help diagnose disc origin pain.

Copyright © 2010 Douglas Husbands, DC. All rights reserved.

Facet Joint Pain: A Common Source of Back Pain

What is Facet Joint Pain?

Facet joint pain results from lack of free motion from the gliding joints at the back of the spinal bones (vertebrae). There are facet joints in all three regions of the spinal column: the cervical region (neck), the thoracic (mid-back) and lumber region (lower back). The facets key function is to guide motion. Smooth, unrestricted motion is necessary to keep the facet joints healthy. Restricted motion for any reason will cause facet joint degeneration and pain. The facet joints are small joints, when compared with the larger joints like the knee, hip and shoulder, but they are similar to these larger joints in that they are lined with cartilage and coated with a lining of joint fluid, called synovial fluid. These joints are supplied by nerves, thus, when the joint is damaged or inflamed, it can produce pain.

Causes of Facet Joint Pain

The facet joints often become injured from trauma, such as falls, auto accidents, sports injuries and even “catching” yourself from slipping. The cartilage in the joints becomes damaged, and if not allowed to heal properly, chronic pain and joint degeneration can occur. Healing involves restoring proper motion, providing key nutrients, and strengthening the surrounding muscles.

Facet Pain Characteristics and Location

Facet pain is often a deep, dull ache. Facet joint pain can be localized or referred to other areas. Lumbar facets can refer pain into the buttocks, groin, hips, and thighs. Lumbar facets don’t often refer pain into the lower legs like lumbar disc pain can, but it can happen.

Diagnosis of Facet Joint Pain

In office orthopedic tests performed by a properly trained and experienced clinician can help differentiate facet pain from other origins of pain, including disc pain. Diagnostic imaging using X-rays, CT-scans or MRI can help diagnose facet joint pain origin.

Copyright © 2010 Douglas Husbands, DC. All rights reserved.